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Hotels in Rosebank, the latest

Holiday In at the Zone

Less than two years ago saw the opening of the 4 star, 8 floors Holiday Inn joining the Zone in Rosebank. The 5 star Monarch boutique hotel was auctioned off last year. The 5 star Winston hotel was featured on Top Billing and renovations of some of big-name hotels continues.

The five-star Hyatt Regency in Oxford road, adjoin the Firs shopping centre, is to be refurbished to the tune of R100m. The hotel was established in 1995 and has had “soft” refurbishments over the years, but an extensive overhaul is now needed according to Hotel manager Michael McBain talking to MoneyWeb last month.

The hotel has been under pressure from regular local and international guests to update its technology and to bring the establishment more in

The Winston Boutique Hotel

line with global standards. One of the items on the refurbishment agenda will be the rebuilding of the walkway between the hotel and the Gautrain station about 100 metres away. The hotel’s banqueting business has soared since the Gautrain opened in October 2011.

The Hyatt Regency

Other areas for refurbishment include the guest contact areas, basic facilities of the rooms, reception area, kitchens and so on. The overall refurbishment is expected to take 2 to 3 years.  The hotel is owned by Investec and is managed by the Hyatt.

This comes on the back of the opening of the new Tsogo Sun’s, 54 on Bath, a five star boutique hotel located on Bath Avenue which opened on 9 July. Sold by Hyprop Investments Limited, the JSE listed property company that own and is expanding the Rosebank Mall next door.

This building used to house the iconic Grace Hotel and office buildings but is now owned by Tsogo Sun Holdings, one of the largest Johannesburg Stock Exchange listed companies in the hotel and tourism sector.

Tsogo Sun’s 54 on Bath

54 on Bath is Tsogo Sun’s first hotel offering in Rosebank. The company owns 14 casino properties located in Gauteng, Western Cape, Eastern Cape, Free State, Mpumalanga and KwaZulu-Natal, and over 90 hotels in South Africa, Africa and Seychelles.

54 on Bath’s featured Level Four Restaurant offers distinctive dining, classical cuisine with a contemporary twist. “The complete remodelling of the hotel redefines us as a modern yet classic, urban chic, city hotel.” Jacques Moolman, hotel manager was quoted as saying recently. He says they hand-picked significant pieces of art from the old hotel and then commissioned local photographer Ryan Hitchcock for a series of compositions of the surrounding neighbourhoods in Johannesburg.

The property boasts 60 deluxe rooms, 12 executive rooms and three executive suites elegantly styled with views over

The Monarch Boutique Hotel

the garden or the green city skyline. It also has three meeting rooms catering for up to 120 people each and a boardroom that seats 20 people.

Another breath-taking feature of this boutique hotel is the famous roof garden on the fourth level as it creates a bridge from city scape to suburban tranquillity.

The Grace Hotel which was closed down in August 2011 was sold to Tsogo Sun Hotel Group for R85 million. Between R20 million and R25 million was spent on refurbishing the property.

Announcing its six months to June results in August, Hyprop said the downturn in the hospitality industry impacted negatively on the performance of the fund’s hotels, The Grace Hotel in Rosebank and Southern Sun Hyde Park.

Rosebank Hotel Crowne Plaza

It wasn’t that long ago that the independent The Rosebank’s Hotel was the only hotel in town, beside the old Residential Oxford Hotel. The Rosebank was whisked away from the Protea group into chic international sophistication by the Crowne Plaza chain of hotels with a R254m refurbishment. Now it stands proud among Rosebank’s other 5 star hotels.  The Rosebank is the only Crowne Plaza in South Africa.

The City Lodge Courtyard

With The Courtyard and The Don representing one end of the market and The Crowne Plaza Rosebank, The Hyatt and the Holiday Inn representing the international brands, that just leaves the boutique hotel business with Tsogo Sun’s 54 on Bath, The Winston and The Monarch. Eight hotels, five of which are five stars, serving one square kilometre, Rosebank is certainly on the map for international and national visitors.

The Don Apartments

Are South African Hotel Rooms Oversupplied and Overpriced

The hospitality industry which boomed in South Africa in 2010 has admittedly had some post World Cup benefit. The industry has also shed some of its fly-by-nighters. However the debate continues as to whether hotel rooms are overpriced and over accommodated. Regardless, the question remains, aren’t hotels a property industry problem and therein lies the root dynamic behind the quantity and price of rooms.

Stepping back and looking at tourism in general we are reminded of what valuable foreign currency it brings into the country. The hospitality industry provides coveted direct employment too. The potential for growth is huge and its knock-on effect on the commercial property world worth taking seriously.

South African tourists, who make up the largest section of the market, have to bear the brunt of the high hotel room rates which are often aimed at the overseas tourist. Despite the belief that foreign tourists are ‘loaded’ there is some resistance to our higher room rates. By comparison Brazil, which is similar to South Africa in some respects, is geographically closer to most of the same source markets that we rely on for inbound visitors. Upscale hotels in the major cities of Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo reported average room rates of between $300 and $400. Although the South African equivalent is around $190 at current exchange rates, the difference can arguably be absorbed by the cost of travelling to South Africa, a destination which is generally regarded as a long-haul destination.

Here’s the rub: High room rates have the knock-on effect of an oversupplied market. Customarily this should lower daily room rates as a result of market forces of supply and demand. However what has been observed is a reduction in occupancy rates. In some parts of the world various solutions are formulated to deal with oversupply. On the other hand other governments have not interfered and left it to market forces. It is important from the outset to ascertain where this oversupply exists and to quantify its extent.

One intervention by hoteliers is to discount room rates. The down side to this is the unintended message that the value has decreased too. To then return to the higher rate becomes a negative movement. Another strategy, instead of dropping rates, is to add value, offering two-for-one deals where visitors get one night ‘free’ on top of the original booking, extras such as free bottles of wine with a dinner in the hotel restaurant or vouchers for various entertainment in the city are supplied.

Countering this there is the school of thought that sees this as only a temporary solution whilst hotels engage in a price war of undercutting rates. The visible nature of hotel rates means short-term occupancy gains are quickly offset as competitors rapidly follow suit in cutting rates. This leads to a lower priced hotel market yielding lower revenues in the face of normally unchanged demand, proving that rate discounting alone does not induce additional hotel demand.

Looking at the big picture, some would encourage government intervention for the tourism industry in general. A more competitive ZAR/dollar exchange rate will help make hotel rates more affordable for the inbound tourist market. The Department of Transport could relook at increasing the number of airport slots for international airlines. This would help bring more visitors  and bring down costs through competition.

One country whose government hasn’t been shy to intervene in the tourism industry is Ireland. A country very dependent on tourism. In the wake of the Global Financial Crisis Ireland’s NAMA (National Asset Management Agency)  took control of over a 100 hotels with the intention of circumventing bankruptcies of the operators through paying out the creditors and then removing the remaining stock from the market. As a result, competition in the market was reduced and room rates were stabilised for the entire market. Although the removal of competition is seldom seen as beneficial in a market economy, especially when taxpayers’ money is involved, such drastic action is a further indication of the seriousness of the hotel room oversupply problem and the extent to which some countries will go to protect their tourism industries.

Coming round to property, many would point out that hotels are, in essence, in the property industry, and construction costs are the capital outlay that hotel incomes and profits have to provide a return on. For the last decade, tender price escalation, as an indication of construction costs, has averaged 12%, indicating that hotel returns are diminishing.

One may argue that new investments in the hotel industry should only have been introduced into the market if the potential for the market was there to ultimately sustain the room rate. By 2008, most market commentators had already forecast the “property bubble” bursting. The SA Reserve Bank Governor issued warnings to businesses and consumers to reduce debt and to forgo acquiring more. Most hotels that entered the market without taking into consideration those warnings, perhaps should not have been built in the first place.

The higher-than-inflation building costs whilst South Africa is experiencing deflationary conditions are similarly to blame for the high average daily room rates. The materials, labour and overheads are also to be considered. Recently the rise in cost of materials has been much more than inflation and other building cost indicators. The largest construction companies were also recently investigated by the Competition Commission for anti-competitive behaviour. Some of them have come clean and have been penalised.

To quote Hotel commentator Makhudu in his online blog article: ‘Hotel Oversupply’: “For the investor, the opinions that room rates are greater than normal means that hotel properties are currently overvalued. Some bankers have gone further than conducting debt reviews. Instead of recalling loans they have on hotel properties they have gone and interfered with the market dynamics by unilaterally dropping rates. Established hoteliers have bitterly criticised the actions of so-called ‘zombie hotels’ which have been taken over by banks and are undercutting rates for the sector in general.”

Reading the market with the wisdom that many of the most experienced hoteliers have, acting with owners who resist the skittishness that has come upon many investors of late, decisions about room rates will hopefully be made with sober judgement and a steady hand. It makes little sense to kill the goose that lays the golden egg. We should cherish every tourist that comes our way and reward them with reasonable rates. History may just remember us according to how well we cared for our golden geese.